Tag Archives: Goldman Sachs

Calumet Specialty Products Partners, L.P. to Attend Upcoming Investor Conferences

Calumet Specialty Products Partners, L.P. (CLMT), a leading independent producer of specialty hydrocarbon and fuels products, today announced that members of management will attend the following upcoming investor conferences:

Goldman Sachs Global Energy Conference
January 8, 2015
InterContinental Hotel – Miami, FL

UBS MLP One-on-One Conference
January 14, 2015
St. Regis Deer Valley – Park City, UT

Calumet’s latest investor presentation will be provided at each of these conferences.  Prior to Calumet’s attendance at the listed conferences, the Partnership will post an electronic copy of the presentation it intends to use in the “Investor Relations” section of the Partnership’s corporate website at www.calumetspecialty.com.

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As Canadian M&A Soars on Oil, Goldman Sachs Becomes Top Adviser, edging out JPMorgan Chase, Royal Bank of Canada, Barclays and Citigroup

Mergers and Acquisitions Conference 2015 New York City

Mergers and Acquisitions Conference 2015 New York City

Goldman Sachs was the top investment banking adviser on Canadian mergers and acquisitions in 2014, as oil and gas and cross-border deals drove takeovers to a seven-year high.

According to Bloomberg, Canadian firms were involved in $229 billion worth of transactions through Dec. 29, the highest annual tally since 2007 and up 45 percent from last year, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.

Goldman advised on $61.6 billion worth of those deals, its highest ever in Canada, and narrowly edging out JPMorgan Chase, which advised on transactions valued at $61.3 billion. Royal Bank of Canada slipped to third spot after three consecutive years at No. 1, while Barclays and Citigroup rounded out the top five. The figures and rankings are based on announced date and subject to change as more deals are recorded.

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Goldman Sachs Outdoes Itself With Biggest M&A Lead Since 1998

Like Meryl Streep at the Oscars, Goldman Sachs Group Inc. isn’t lacking acclaim for its merger and acquisition advisory business. It’s finished first in deal volume for five consecutive years and in nine of the last 10.

Even so, Goldman Sachs outdid itself this year. No top firm has had a larger market-share spread over its nearest competitor since 1998. The New York-based bank advised on more than 35 percent of all deals this year by dollar volume, as of Dec. 15, surpassing second-place Morgan Stanley by about 10 percentage points, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. That’s the largest market share lead between the No. 1 and No. 2 financial adviser since Goldman Sachs trumped what’s now called JPMorgan Chase & Co. by 14 percentage points 16 years ago.

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Goldman Sachs’s David Kostin on Why 2015 Could be Better than We Think

According to CNBC, Goldman Sachs already appears to be having second thoughts on its tepid forecast for 2015.

The firm’s clients believe Goldman is overestimating how much interest rates will rise in the years ahead, strategist David Kostin said in his weekly report that summarized recent meetings with market pros.

Kostin has projected the Federal Reserve‘s target funds rate to hit 3.9 percent by the end of 2018. Fund managers, though, believe slow global growth and low inflation will keep the U.S. central bank in only modest hiking mode, translating to just a 2 percent funds rate in that span.

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World Led by U.S. Poised for Fastest Growth Since 2010

According to Bloomberg,

The world economy is primed for its fastest expansion in four years, with the U.S. propelling the improvement in output.

Global growth will accelerate at least 3.4 percent in 2014 from less than 3 percent this year as the euro area recovers from recession and China and other emerging markets stabilize, according to economists at Goldman Sachs Group Inc., Deutsche Bank AG and Morgan Stanley. The U.K. will be a standout, while Japan risks damping the mood by suffering a mid-year slowdown after an April increase in sales taxes.

“So far it’s been a very bumpy, below-par and brittle expansion,” said Joachim Fels, co-chief global economist at Morgan Stanley in London. “Next year could bring a very important transition: a transition to a sounder, safer and more sustainable recovery.”

The upturn should prove bullish for equities and bearish for bonds. If it boosts corporate confidence in the durability of growth, it could further fuel demand, raising the odds that 2014 will break the pattern of recent years and come in better, rather than worse, than projected.

“An improving global-growth picture is widely forecast but, in our view, also still doubted in the investor community,” said Dominic Wilson, chief markets economist at Goldman Sachs in New York. “We therefore see room for markets to price in a better cyclical story.”

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Volcker Rule Ushers in Era of Increased Oversight of Trades

According to Bloomberg,

Wall Street faces more intensive government scrutiny of trading after U.S. regulators issued what they billed as a strict Volcker rule today, imposing new curbs designed to prevent financial blowups while leaving many details to be worked out later.

The Federal Reserve, Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. and three other agencies formally adopted the proprietary trading ban. The rule has been contested by JPMorgan Chase & Co., Goldman Sachs Group Inc. and their industry allies for more than three years.

Wall Street’s lobbying efforts paid off in easing some provisions of the rule. Regulators granted a broader exemption for banks’ market-making desks, on the condition that traders aren’t paid in a way that rewards proprietary trading. The regulation also exempts some securities tied to foreign sovereign debt.

At the same time, regulators said the final version imposed stricter restrictions on hedging, providing banks less leeway for classifying bets as broad hedges for other risks. To pursue a hedge, banks would need to provide detailed and updated information for review by on-site bank supervisors.

Limiting Risks

 

“This provision of the Dodd-Frank Act has the important objective of limiting excessive risk-taking by depository institutions and their affiliates,” Fed Chairman Ben S. Bernanke said in a statement. “The ultimate effectiveness of the rule will depend importantly on supervisors, who will need to find the appropriate balance while providing feedback to the board on how the rule works in practice.”

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Warren Hits Banks, Expands Base to Solidify Senate Power

According to Bloomberg,

Elizabeth Warren, in her first year as a U.S. senator, has captured headlines by pressuring such industry titans as Goldman Sachs Chairman Lloyd C. Blankfein for transparency, including a Dec. 4 call for Wall Street banks to disclose their contributions to policy groups that provide financial analysis to Congress.

With less fanfare, she’s forging alliances with Republican Senate colleagues, expanding her political network in Massachusetts, and tapping her backers to help Democrats running for re-election in other states.

It’s a strategy that sounds a lot like one adopted by another woman who entered the chamber with a national profile that made her a lightning-rod for praise and derision as she was dogged by questions about her presidential aspirations.

“I think she’s followed a path not unlike that of Hillary Clinton, which is learn how to be a senator,” said Ross Baker, a political science professor at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, New Jersey.

“Clearly, she has decided not to be a liberal Ted Cruz, to learn the ropes, particularly in the area that she cares most about, which is financial services,” Baker said, contrasting Warren with the Texas Republican freshman senator whose push to defund the 2010 health-care law helped lead to the partial government shutdown in October.

Future Contests

Warren, 64, is building relationships that could be helpful in future races, nationally or statewide. While she has said she won’t run for president in 2016 and signed a letter encouraging Clinton to do so, she’s also seizing on speculation about her future to advance her causes.

Asked by reporters on Dec. 4 if the presidential speculation hurts or helps her consumer-oriented legislative proposals, she said: “I’m glad to see any possible energy put behind those fights.”

Related: Elizabeth Warren Versus the Think Tanks

After rising to prominence as a critic of the housing and financial industries during the 2008 financial collapse, Warren became the architect for the Obama administration of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, created by the 2010 Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act. After she failed to secure the top job at the bureau, Warren won her Senate seat by challenging Republican incumbent Scott Brown in 2012.

At her first appearance as a member of the Senate banking committee in February, she asserted that Wall Street firms had become “too big for trial” and, at a March hearing, she criticized regulators because no one went to jail after HSBC Holding Plc operations in the U.S. admitted to enabling Mexican and Caribbean drug cartels to launder billions of dollars.

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