Tag Archives: Paulson & Co.

Paulson Said to Inform Clients He Won’t Add More to Gold

According to Bloomberg,

Billionaire John Paulson, the best-known gold bull since he started wagering on bullion more than three years ago, is backing away from his bet.

Paulson told clients at his firm’s annual meeting Nov. 20 that he personally wouldn’t invest more money in his gold fund because it’s not clear when inflation will accelerate, according to a person familiar with the matter. The hedge-fund manager, who has been betting that bullion would rally as a hedge against inflation and as recently as last year told clients that gold was his best long-term bet, has lost 63 percent year-to-date in the PFR Gold Fund, said the person, who was briefed on the returns and asked not to be identified because the information is private.

Paulson, 57, started his foray into gold in early 2009, betting that bullion would rise as governments printed money to revive their economies following the 2008 financial crisis. Gold-related securities helped drive losses for the firm in 2012 as mining company stocks fell. Paulson & Co.’s main strategies have gained this year on bets in mergers, defaulted securities, convertible bonds and telecommunications, energy, insurance and asset-management companies.

The fund, which has shrunk to $370 million — with most of that John Paulson’s own money — from $1 billion at the end of 2012, fell 1.2 percent in October, the person said. The hedge-fund firm will maintain the fund’s positions in gold stocks and let options related to bullion expire, Paulson said at the meeting in Paulson & Co.’s New York office, according to the person.

Hedge-fund Manager John Paulson (Bloomberg)

Hedge-fund Manager John Paulson (Bloomberg)

Armel Leslie, a spokesman for $19 billion Paulson & Co. with WalekPeppercomm, declined to comment on the meeting and fund returns.

Bullion’s Slump

Gold is heading for its first annual drop in 13 years as some investors lost faith in the metal as a store of value, fueled by concern that expected reductions in $85 billion of monthly bond buying by the U.S. Federal Reserve will ease the risk of accelerating inflation. Billionaires George Soros and Daniel Loeb sold their entire positions in the SPDR Gold Trust exchange-traded fund in the second quarter, according to regulatory filings. Inflation expectations as measured by the break-even rate for five-year Treasury Inflation Protected Securities fell 12 percent this year.

Bullion has slumped 26 percent this year to $1,246.30 an ounce at 3:21 p.m. in London and reached $1,236.88 yesterday, the lowest since July 9.

Hedge funds and other money managers have cut their net-long positions in gold to 55,456 futures and options as of Nov. 12, according to the latest data from the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission. The holdings are down 48 percent this year.

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Paulson Steps Up Gold Bet to 44% of Firm’s Equity Assets

Billionaire John Paulson raised his stake in an exchange-traded fund tracking the price of gold while selling other stocks during the second quarter, leaving his $21 billion hedge fund with more than 44 percent of its U.S. traded equities tied to bullion.

Reported by  Miles Weiss and Kelly Bit, Bloomberg News, Paulson & Co. purchased an additional 4.53 million shares of the SPDR Gold Trust, the firm’s largest position, and bought more shares of NovaGold Resources Inc. (NG), according to a Form 13F filed yesterday with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. Gold prices posted their biggest declines since 2008 last quarter.

While Paulson trimmed his stake in AngloGold Ashanti Ltd. (ANG) and Gold Fields Ltd. (GFI), sales of energy, financial and auto-parts stocks boosted the relative weighting of gold-related securities in his U.S. stock portfolio to the highest in three years. That’s making the fund more vulnerable to declines in the price of bullion as the hedge-fund manager struggles to reverse record losses last year.

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Trader Racks Up a Second Epic Gain

The Wall Street Journal’s Greg Zuckerman reported that hedge fund manager John Paulson personally netted more than $5 billion in profits in 2010—likely the largest one-year haul in investing history, trumping the nearly $4 billion he made with his “short” bets against subprime mortgages in 2007.

Mr. Paulson’s take, described by investors and people close to investment firm Paulson & Co., shows how profits continue to pile up for elite hedge-fund managers. Appaloosa Management founder David Tepper and Bridgewater Associates chief Ray Dalio each personally made between $2 billion and $3 billion last year, according to investors and people familiar with the situation. James Simons, founder of Renaissance Technologies LLC, also produced profits in that range, say investors in his firm.

 

By comparison, Goldman Sachs Group Inc., Wall Street’s most profitable investment bank, paid all of its 36,000 employees a total of $8.35 billion last year. James Gorman, chief executive of 76-year-old investment bank Morgan Stanley, is expected to receive compensation of less than $15 million for 2010.

Mr. Paulson and his fellow managers seldom take much of their profits in cash. Some of the profits are so-called paper gains, which reflect the rising value of their firms’ holdings, and could erode if those investments sour. Other gains come from selling investments, and most of those are rolled back into their funds.

Mr. Paulson and the other top managers made winning bets on commodities, emerging-market companies, bank shares and U.S. Treasury bonds, among other investments. These moves, along with profitable picks by other funds, are part of the reason the hedge-fund industry is back on its feet after a rough stretch. Assets managed by hedge funds have grown to a near-record $1.92 trillion, up 20% over the past year. Assets jumped almost $150 billion in the fourth quarter alone, the largest quarterly growth on record, according to Hedge Fund Research, Inc.

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